Recommendation Paper on the Implementation of a Plastic Bag Charge in Singapore

September 12, 2016 by  
Filed under Insights

Recommendation Paper on the Implementation of a Plastic Bag Charge in SingaporeIn June 2016, we published our Position Paper on the Reduction of Single-Use Plastic Disposables in Singapore, to urge the government and businesses to develop concrete plans and take bold actions to reduce the consumption of single-use plastic disposables.

As a follow-up to our Position Paper and to focus specifically on the problem of excessive usage and wastage of single-use plastic bags in Singapore, Zero Waste SG recently conducted a public survey on a plastic bag charge. The survey would help us to understand the opinion of supermarket shoppers on a charge for plastic bags and whether they are ready for a plastic bag charge in the future.

This recommendation paper shows the results of the survey and recommends that the government introduce a mandatory plastic bag charge scheme to reduce the excessive usage and wastage of single-use plastic bags and to encourage people to bring their own reusable bags.

Download Recommendation Paper on the Implementation of a Plastic Bag Charge in Singapore (634 downloads )

Food waste recycling trial at hawker centres and markets

January 23, 2016 by  
Filed under Insights

Food waste recycling trial - Ang Mo Kio 1

A two-year on-site food waste recycling trial at Ang Mo Kio Blk 628 Market and Tiong Bahru Market was launched by the National Environment Agency (NEA) on Thursday, to test the economic viability and operational feasibility of two different types of on-site food waste recycling systems. The systems are leased by NEA from two vendors – Eco Wiz (SG) and VRM Operations (Singapore), and the vendors would also be in-charge of maintaining the systems. The pilot trial is expected to conclude in Dec 2017.

Zero Waste SG visited the 2 trial markets for the launch, which include both hawker centres and wet markets. Ang Mo Kio Blk 628 Market (with 218 stalls) generates about two tonnes of food waste per day, while Tiong Bahru Market (with 342 stalls) generates about three tonnes of food waste per day. Most of the food waste are generated from market slab stalls and table cleaning operations. The food waste recycling systems could reduce up to 80% of the total waste generated from both locations. Read more

Food Waste Habits of Households in Singapore

October 16, 2015 by  
Filed under Insights

The 2015 Electrolux Food Waste At Home Survey revealed the food waste habits of households in Singapore. The survey was conducted by Electrolux based on 1,000 respondents from 18-65 years old.

Some of the key findings show that:

77% of Singaporeans regularly waste food at home, with almost a third refusing to eat leftovers.

41% of Singaporeans only think about food waste occasionally despite households contributing to the 788,600 tonnes of food waste generated in Singapore each year.

The top five reasons why food is wasted at homes:

  1. Preparing too much food / taking too much food on your plate (51%)
  2. Forgotten about food: out-of-date food at the back of their fridge because they just can’t see it (48%)
  3. Catering for fussy eaters (31%)
  4. Households not liking leftovers (23%)
  5. Rarely eating together as a family (11%)

The most common items thrown away each week:

  1. Cooked rice (51%)
  2. Vegetables/salad (49%)
  3. Cooked meat/fish (45%)

The survey was timed to kickstart #happyplatesg, a six-week community initiative to raise awareness of food waste in Singapore, one plate at a time. Through this, Electrolux intends to rally the help of Singaporeans to support at least 1,000 local families in need through the campaign’s beneficiary, The Food Bank Singapore.

happyplateSG

Source and image credit: Electrolux Asia Pacific

How Much Food Do You Waste In Singapore?

October 13, 2015 by  
Filed under Insights

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) celebrates World Food Day each year on 16 October. This year, we would like to remember World Food Day by spreading awareness and action on food waste reduction.

Together with Helpling, an online platform that connects you to cleaners, we have created this infographic to show you how much food we waste in Singapore.

How much food do you waste in Singapore

Now that you understand how much food we waste in Singapore, the next step is for you to play a part in reducing food waste in your daily life and at home. Simply follow the 8 tips below and start reducing food waste!

1) Learn About Food Sources

Learn about where your food comes from and understand how farmers toil to produce your food. This would help you better appreciate the food you eat and thus waste less food.

2) Grow Your Own Food

Grow your own food in Singapore to better appreciate your food and waste less. This would also help to reduce the food wastage during transportation and storage, the resources spent, and carbon emissions generated from importing food.

3) Plan What To Buy

Before you go shopping for food, plan what to buy using a shopping list. This would help you avoid buying more food than you need.

4) Store And Handle Food Properly

Store and handle your food properly at home to help you keep food longer without spoilage, and thus reduce food wastage.

5) Cook And Order Just Enough

Choose the right food portions and cook just enough food. Also order just enough food, thus avoiding food waste and saving money.

6) Cook Your Leftover Food

Keep and cook your leftover food instead of throwing them away, thus helping to reduce food wastage at home.

7) Start Food Composting

Try composting your fruit and vegetable scraps at home or in the community garden, and produce compost for gardening.

8) Make Garbage Enzyme

Make garbage enzyme from your fruit and vegetable scraps, and use it for cleaning purposes.

Finally, sign the pledge to Save Food Cut Waste in Singapore, and share this post with your friends and encourage them to reduce food waste together!

Infographic credit: Helpling

Going Paperless in the Corporate Economy

September 15, 2015 by  
Filed under Insights

This post is contributed by Kimmy Paulino from Eco-Savvy Rebel.

It’s been more than 20 years since email was brought out to the world. It has probably saved the world a billion tons of paper with the revolution. Our personal and business correspondences were made faster and faster with internet speed, inbox size and user-friendly interfaces.

In the corporate scene, you can always see a lot of wasteful practices. I remember ‘ol colleagues who need to print all their emails because they can’t keep track of the trails, or those who need to send over CDs for massive files. Tools have been introduced to solve these issues and are now considered norms. Read more

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